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  • Writer's pictureAllison Legendre

How This Jazzy Couple Created a Multi-6-Figure Music Brand



The following is a conversation I recently had with New York’s Jazzy R&B duo Elasea Douglas and Sadiki Pierre, or better known as, Acute Inflections.


Acute Inflections’ music has been featured on major networks such as Discovery and NPR


And they are a favourite performer for clients which include:


  • Google

  • JPMorgan

  • Chase

  • The United Nations

  • The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

  • Tiffany & Co


They also perform their own shows at Legendary venues such as:


  • Birdland

  • City Winery

  • Cotton Club

  • Jazz at Lincoln Center


Have shared the stage with many other renowned artists by opening concerts for:


  • Patti LaBelle

  • Sting

  • Jennifer Hudson

  • DJ Jazzy Jeff

  • Keith Urban


Throughout this conversation, we talk about branding, using social media, how to build fans and clients at the same time, and the art of running a stellar business and relationships simultaneously.


Coming from a background of being a wedding musician, I found Sadiki and Elsea’s advice on acquiring corporate clients particularly interesting as well as their insight into the world of ticketed shows.


But probably my favorite part of the conversation was just having the opportunity to spend some time with these incredible humans. This is the Musicwork podcast and I’m Allison Legendre. Please enjoy.




Allison:

All right, so I'm here with Sadiki and El, and from Acute Inflections, and I'm really excited to have this conversation with them today. If you guys haven't heard their music before anyone needs to go on Spotify if I right now, give them a listen because they have something really unique and really cool brand of business that I'm super excited to dig into and learn more about. So thank you so much, Sidikiand for joining me here today.


Acute Inflections:

Thank you for having us.


Allison:

Of course, so let's start. I know you guys have likely told this story before, but for the sake of our audience, I know it. I'd love to just recap how you guys started acute inflections. That because it's such a fun story.


Acute Inflections:

I'll let her tell it and then I'll fix whatever she misses.



Acute Inflections:

It all started on a cold night in Brooklyn. I was performing on stage with... some of my cast mates from the Broadway show, Fela. We did a little concert post it closing and Sadiki was a fan of that Broadway show, he and his friends, so they came to that concert. He didn't know who I was, but when he walked into the room, he was smitten, happened to be on stage performing at the time. And so after the show, we spoke to each other. Later that evening, he offered me a ride home and he has not left my side since. Fast forward about a year later, we kind of stumbled upon acute inflections totally by accident. There was a performance that should have had an entire band, but the piano player suggested that Sadiki and I just do it. I said, no, let's do the whole band. They have the show, the rest of the band didn't show up. So Sadiki and I ended up having to do the show. Everyone loved it and then it spiraled into acute infections.


Acute Inflections:

How'd I do? Not bad.


Allison:

I love that story, Because what you guys have is so unique and what you're able to do with you know, the two instruments, vocals and base is really quite remarkable. So it's always interesting to hear how that kind of was created, So I'm curious when you guys first started acute inflections. What was the original vision you guys had? If anything, Or how has that changed from where you were then to where you are now


Acute Inflections:

Well, originally I don't think we envisioned anything to do with private events and weddings and fancy parties. You know, we thought we were going to be like real artists. Not that we're not real artists, but you know, the business side of this was not part of the vision at all. We thought we'd be performing in little, you know, jazz clubs and coffee shops and music festivals and things like that. But... You have bills to pay, so you learn very quickly that you got to go where the money is, at least in the beginning of your career. So I'd say over the past ten years we've really had to focus on making the private event scene profitable, and we've been very successful with that. So there's been a lot of hard work and a lot of lessons learned. And over the last two or three years, now we're starting to go back to what the original vision was and doing more and more. public shows and showing people who we really are. Because I think for the private events, it's like just be quiet and make music and don't say a word to anyone and just take pictures and smile. And in the public space, people wanna know who the artist is. They wanna know like your favorite food and do you watch sports and things like that. So it's been fun kind of finally being able to be ourselves on stage.


Allison:

I love that, and that's something that I noticed with you guys right away, which is so incredible, but really rare. Is that that you have this really unique brand identity and music that you do. That's totally you, but you also are available for hire, for you know, really big clients, of course, like Mercedes and Tiffany, and all these cool things that you are doing, But yeah, in the private event space, as well as being like you, said quote, Unquote real artists producing your own albums, do Your shows and things like that. How, tell me, how did you think about going ahead and establishing a brand that is capable of both of those, both of those things, because I find it such a rare thing.


Acute Inflections:

I think we both kind of had a little dab in business.


Allison:

M.


Acute Inflections:

And we kind of took those lessons over to this side of thinking, I guess.


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

Thinking of ourselves, yes, as artists, but wanting to be... well-fed and knowing that we needed finances to support it. And that it just takes a different kind of approach. So we were ready to do that kind of work


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

and look at it that way. So it just helped. We weren't that naive kind of going into it. We just knew that. because we want to remain independent and not a slave to anyone saying that we can't do something a certain way because we're being funded by them, sorry, that kind of forced us to come into it with a different mindset.


Allison:

So


Acute Inflections:

Yeah,


Allison:

the independence


Acute Inflections:

and


Allison:

was important. Go ahead,


Acute Inflections:

we're also here in New York, you know, and there's just... an unbelievable amount of competition. So I think just to stand out with a project that initially looks like, well, this isn't going to work. You know, most people who know anything about music, if you see just bass and voice on the stage, you're like, well, that's not enough. So we knew that we needed to use everything in our power to capture your attention, at least make you curious, at least


Allison:

Hm.


Acute Inflections:

have you say, well, they look all right, they're dressed nicely, let me press play and see what this is about. So, yeah, we had to be pretty calculated and very, in a way, conservative, but also very stylish. You needed a brand that had like some wow, some impact. And that's what we've been building and refining. And, you know, I think we've got it in a pretty good pocket now, I think.


Allison:

Of course, absolutely. I would totally agree that you guys have. I can see that you've been really strategic building the brand and making it very. you know, presentable. I think that's a big aspect of what you guys do. The whole show is definitely something that I think can captivate an audience in a lot o different ways, and I think just having the as a duet Frijez really does help spark that curiosity as well. So I think that are really import important pieces. You mentioned that you guys had you know some background in business to mind expanding a little bit more about that or what were some previous sort of adventures


Acute Inflections:

Yeah,


Allison:

you had.


Acute Inflections:

Siddiqui was, I guess, a mortgage broker for some time before the market crashed. And he was kind of, he sort of, I wouldn't say worked independently, he still worked underneath certain branches, but he was able to work from home. So his approach was a little bit more, it was outside of the box. which ended up making him quite apprised. I was a very surprised mortgage broker in the industry. And as for me, I did a little bit of sales for a yacht company at some point, which allowed me to see the similarities, I guess, with being on stage and also basically producing crews for a client. The ins and outs are pretty much like a production. You have your set up, and then when the event starts, it's show time, you know? So,


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

and then also just the selling aspect of it, the guest experience, those types of things translates to what we're doing, even on the business end of acute inflections. Us having to think through the entire process of when someone... sends us an inquiry all the way down to post their event. All those little touches, the details are important to the success of it all. And of course, finances,


Allison:

M, hm,


Acute Inflections:

managing your finances, being willing to invest in the growth, the marketing, the education, all that stuff kind of happened or was plugged into it. was brought over because of our past experiences in business.


Allison:

M. I love that. So it sounds like you guys you know had this vision for this project and you knew you wanted to be able to you know, reach, you know your people and build your fans, but you knew that the way to get there is you needed to make something sustainable, so you're like Hey, let's follow where the people who are paying is and make sure that we get something turning there, and at the same time we're going to be building our brand. Um, Does that sound about how it happened?


Acute Inflections:

Pretty much, yep.


Allison:

Yeah, well, it's so clever because I see so often musicians who have their original music and they think that it's just needs to be completely separate from what they do in the private events space. What do you think about that? Do you think they're missing out on? You know the power of having focus of just building things all together.


Acute Inflections:

Yeah, definitely. But I also think that depending on what your original music sounds like,


Allison:

Right,


Acute Inflections:

for some musicians it might be wise to keep them separate.


Allison:

Keep it quiet,


Acute Inflections:

Yeah,


Allison:

right,


Acute Inflections:

I mean it depends on, you know, like if your private event clients want something that's very conservative and clean and if your private event music, I'm sorry, if your public music is a little more... edgy and maybe there's profanity there, things like that. Especially nowadays where people are so opinionated


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

and judgmental sometimes. But I would say we're artists, we're creative. Figure


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

out a creative way to bridge the two. Even if you have some crossover songs, like certain songs that are... you know from your public like your albums and stuff but can be played at private events and things like that just to get people curious and interested.


Allison:

M. I'm curious how you've seen the cross over between people who hire you and the people who come to your shows, and you know going to or thou guys and all the fun things that you do. Is there a lot of cross over there between? like the clients we can say and the fans,


Acute Inflections:

It's starting to happen.


Allison:

Yeah,


Acute Inflections:

What's interesting, they would have remained separate, I think, if it wasn't for the pandemic.


Allison:

M,


Acute Inflections:

Once we went virtual, it forced a lot of our clients that we would usually do in-person events for. When they went virtual with us, it allowed them to kind of see our personalities more because we were even discovering that it's okay to show our personalities a little bit more laid back. And so


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

that caused us to develop our humor together


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

and as individuals. I like to think I still sort of funny. I mean,


Allison:

Yeah,


Acute Inflections:

we always had like funny banter. I think every couple of probably has funny banter between them, but


Allison:

Right,


Acute Inflections:

just figuring out how much you can show on stage and


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

people enjoying it sort of encourages you to be more open with it. So once that passed and we started doing the public shows again, everyone who's on our email list,


Allison:

M,


Acute Inflections:

clients and not, they all started to come to the shows and it's kind of, we laughed at it sometimes where we see a diverse group of people in the audience that are wealthy and not so wealthy all because we chose to kind of... show both sides at the same time. So they kind of gained that trust. They were very surprised. A lot of our clients said, I had no idea you guys were this funny. I knew your music was great, but you guys are like a thing. Like, you know, it's kind of fun to see. So thank you, Pandemic, I guess. Yeah, but I think the demand was there because a lot of the feedback we get at private events, people essentially say, I wish everyone would shut up. I wish that I could come to a show and see something like this, you know. But they just automatically assume that if you're performing at a wedding, that that's all you do. So,


Allison:

M,


Acute Inflections:

and it's not like you're supposed to be saying like, hey, congratulations, Mr. and Mrs. Smith. And if you guys are around on Friday, come see us at, you know, Smoke Jazz Club. Like, you're not, that's not appropriate.


Allison:

Right, right,


Acute Inflections:

So you don't really have much of an opportunity to sort of change that in people's minds, that assumption.


Allison:

You got. So that is actually a really big key there. I think that you guys kind of learn to show your personalities and it was through people being online in social media that you're able to kind of convert the clients over into the fan group as well, and because it's something that I was actually surprised by just with other music groups that it's surprising how that transition, or like merging those two worlds can be challenging sometimes because I feel sometimes when people hire you they're like. You know they're like, Oh my God, I'm so excited. It's like your number one thing. At other times, it's just like checking a box to other people, so


Acute Inflections:

Yeah.


Allison:

to be able to show that, you know, this is something that you can get excited about and kind of build fans with clients. I think having social media showing you personality, I think that's gonna be a big key for other musicians to tap into, So thank you for for sharing that. And yeah, I also want to touch on social media because you guys are so fun like I have noticed that as well, have you kind of grown your personal brand And you know the mail marketing. I know you're really being on Instagram as well. Tell us about. you know the world of your social media of life, and how you go about connecting with your audience. What's your approach?


Acute Inflections:

Uh, the approach is get yelled at by our social media person and just try to post content that'll shut her up.


Allison:

U, h


Acute Inflections:

Yeah, it's been one. giant decade-long debate at this point because I


Allison:

M


Acute Inflections:

think naturally we're not social media people, but we've learned that it's vital, it's a necessary evil, and it's tricky trying to be on there enough to remain present, but also not let it consume you and take up too much time and attention. But yeah, we try to make sure that we're just adding value, either it's something interesting or something inspiring or something funny. And also try to steer clear of the more controversial stuff on there. We want our music to unite people. And we've got to sort of stay in a specific lane to do that.


Allison:

Wisdom? So what is the your platform of choice Or what platform have you found to be most useful for you guys? Whether it's like social media or even email marketing? What do you or is it a combination?


Acute Inflections:

I'd say Facebook's probably the most effective for getting our fans to shows.


Allison:

M,


Acute Inflections:

As far as generating business, the private event business I'd have to say is emails. Emails and sometimes text. Yeah, emails. We have a text messaging list. I mean, it seems like social media generates inquiries that are just quite like, it is I guess lower budget inquiries. So that's the thing there. You gotta sort of explain to them that, you know, a lot of people say like, hey, I'm having a birthday party for my husband, you know, that kind of thing. You know,


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

love to have you guys, and you have to explain to them like, this is what it costs in the real world. Like, have you ever hired


Allison:

Right,


Acute Inflections:

entertainment before?


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

Versus email, you know, you're emailing past clients. They already know, you know, they have an idea of what this costs, and do the questions, you know, sound systems, and blah, blah, blah, blah.


Allison:

Got it. So when you say email marketing is useful for you know, getting clients to resign on is that when you're like sending broadcast emails or more direct approach, Or what does that look like?


Acute Inflections:

No, mostly broadcast.


Allison:

Okay, just kind


Acute Inflections:

Yeah,


Allison:

of reminds


Acute Inflections:

just


Allison:

them


Acute Inflections:

like


Allison:

like.


Acute Inflections:

in...


Allison:

Hey, we hired them last year. Let's get them back. Type thing


Acute Inflections:

Right. Yeah, exactly,


Allison:

perfect.


Acute Inflections:

exactly. Yeah, and you just, you know, you don't even have to like remind people that you did their event or anything like that. You just let them know that you're still alive and you're making music. That's all they


Allison:

Right?


Acute Inflections:

need to say. And they're like, hey, let's have them back. They agree.


Allison:

Okay, I love that so I'm curious to diving to that world a bit because I'm less familiar with it. I know the weddings, but when it comes to the corporate entertainment, tell us about that. So do you get a lot of clients signing up again when you after you do one event for them?


Acute Inflections:

Yeah, we do have a lot of, I guess, reoccurring clients,


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

repeat clients, as they say. Yeah, which we're always grateful for. And how does that work? You just make sure you nail it the first


Allison:

Right,


Acute Inflections:

time. Make the booking process as seamless as possible. And really, we really focus on being as helpful and alleviating as much I guess hassle for them,


Allison:

M,


Acute Inflections:

you know, with the contract process is real straightforward, our attention to detail with, you know, our equipment requirements or being willing to provide more for them


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

to make their end of things more efficient, you know, if you can. You know, if you


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

can provide sound, provide it. Yeah, so I think things like that. And if they don't need to keep it different for their guest, then those are the moments where we get called back a lot. If their guests are not picky and if they love it, they will keep coming back. So a lot of them eat at the same or host their event at the same venue every year. and


Allison:

M,


Acute Inflections:

they call us back, thank goodness, every year.


Allison:

Uh, huh,


Acute Inflections:

Because it works, it works. They just want to have a great time and talk to the people that they don't see, that they only see once a year. So it works, I think. Yeah, definitely. And also, what we do isn't obnoxious, not to offend anybody, but


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

we're good for if you. Yes we're good for entertaining if you want to focus zero in on the performance, but we're really great also for just the background experience. If you want to be in your conversation, then notice the song and then go back to your conversation.


Allison:

M,


Acute Inflections:

We're really good, great for that.


Allison:

M. Amazing, So it seems like what's important to those corporate clients based off what you're sharing how you treat them is that they're looking for efficiency, and just like you know, looking to get things done and know that they don't need to worry about it, and making sure you're giving them nothing to worry about when you're working with them. Would you say that's an


Acute Inflections:

Yeah.


Allison:

important part of working with them? Got it


Acute Inflections:

Yeah.


Allison:

okay?


Acute Inflections:

I think they also appreciate. Like some of our clients will have a vision and it's like, we politely just tell them like, yeah, that's, you can do that and it will work, but they also appreciate someone who will give them some insight and kind of say, well,


Allison:

M,


Acute Inflections:

here's a better way to do it, or here's what's worked in the past at other events. So


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

that's really worked for us sharing, you know, experiences from other events so that we can help make the next event better than they originally intended or planned for it to be. But yeah, definitely the whole, ease of use. It always cracks me up when people write a review of us online and they're like, their music's great and they look great but they're so easy to work with, you know? Like


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

it seems like they really enjoyed that it was easy to work with and to what she said I think just being overly prepared and overly generous and that sort of thing pays dividends.


Allison:

Awesome, So these clients you can get kind of repeat business with them through email marketing. What about how they find you guys? Initially? What lead generation streams have you guys found are really good for you.


Acute Inflections:

I think networking is the best way, just in


Allison:

Okay,


Acute Inflections:

person events, like find those event industry meeting planners, those types of networking groups, and


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

just offer, say hey, at your next meeting would you like some entertainment, donate a performance.


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

You might have to donate several performances and hang around and hand out business cards. invite them to your next show, tell them, I'll throw you on the guest list, that sort of thing,


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

just to develop relationships. And once you have the relationships, you can go to the next show. You can go to the next show. everyone knows everyone in the event industry so you know if you get mary to start working with you then she tells george and you know before you know it everyone's calling you and it's kind of a funny thing we laugh about the event industry is the turnover rate is ridiculous we'll have a friend that we met working at the Hyatt you know in manhattan the next thing you know he's managing this hotel in brooklyn and two years later he's over here all his colleagues like, hey, I've used this group before, and you're just spreading


Allison:

M,


Acute Inflections:

through all these hotels that you never even heard of, just because everyone's moving around so much. So I think just make those relationships right up front. It's an investment in time and money and that sort of thing, but it pays off. Yeah, and when you are gonna go to these networking events, when I say be presentable, be likable, brush your teeth, wear something nice, You know, go in there with confidence because if you're awkward, it makes somebody else awkward, you know, or feel awkward. So just be a likable person. And what does


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

that look like for you? You know, pick it till you make it if you're not.


Allison:

That's so good now Net working events. Those are you saying That happens in kind of the business world for corporate events, too, or just more like the event planners.


Acute Inflections:

uh... not happens on both sides


Allison:

Okay,


Acute Inflections:

a lot of the meeting plans from different companies will go to the same events that plan is going to and vice versa they got different conventions and conferences uh...


Allison:

M,


Acute Inflections:

for all of that. It's totally intermingled. People have had their own event planning company go work for the mayor or the governor's event office and then next


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

thing you know they're back. It's a lot of cross-pollination going on there.


Allison:

Perfect. And so how do you go about finding those conventions that you can start to meet people at?


Acute Inflections:

Google.


Allison:

Yeah,


Acute Inflections:

Yeah, just Google and social media. You know, there


Allison:

right,


Acute Inflections:

are certain hashtags you can follow


Allison:

Right,


Acute Inflections:

like event pros, event professionals, things like that.


Allison:

Okay,


Acute Inflections:

And you'll find them. There are a few different organizations that say ILEA. which is I think the International Live Event Association or something like that. They have different


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

chapters all over. There's one called NACE, which I think is the National Association of Catering and Events, which is a good one. There's MPI meeting. Planners Incorporated maybe, I don't know. So they're probably like, once you start Googling them, Google will probably start suggesting like, oh, you're looking for this kind of stuff. We'll tell you about this group and that group. You'll find what you're looking for. You gotta be curious and do some digging.


Allison:

Amazing, and that's something I've noticed about both of you That you are researchers and you seem to always be learning and always growing. So you know if you could share a little bit about that with with us and the audience, what drives you guys to just keep learning And how useful how you found that to be and growing your brand,


Acute Inflections:

Education definitely is key. Uh... Yeah, super useful. Very. We learned pretty early. There was a book that we both read called The Secrets to a Millionaire Mind. What's the name of this author? I think it's T. Harv Ecker or something like that. Yeah. He was really big on investing in yourself and that could be via education putting money into building whatever you are focused on. If you


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

don't invest in you, you can't expect anyone else to invest in you. But also just educating yourself. There's always something to learn in order to get better at.


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

So we are constantly trying to... just become more aware of things. And especially, we both grew up in kind of conservative homes, so there's a lot of information that just we were not, did not have access to. So I love


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

YouTube. I learned so much.


Allison:

Right,


Acute Inflections:

I catch up on everything through YouTube a lot.


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

But also what keeps us going is sometimes when you just get in this rut or you become a little complacent something will happen uh... uh... you bob ashore something just reminds you this is why continue working you can


Allison:

M,


Acute Inflections:

you continue rehearsing continue pursuing knowledge in this thing because if you know it all you know nothing i guess


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

you know you really don't know anything if you


Allison:

Right,


Acute Inflections:

And I


Allison:

That's


Acute Inflections:

think,


Allison:

good.


Acute Inflections:

you know, not to get too dark here, but as artists we need to learn the mistakes of other artists. And there's


Allison:

M,


Acute Inflections:

so many horror stories from other artists who just wanted to focus on the music. You know, they're like, that's the dream. I just do the music and I have my record label and my manager and whoever else do everything for me. But then you hear about these same artists later on in their careers being broke, you know, bankrupt, that sort of thing. And guess who's living in the mansion and flying around in a corporate room? Well, your record label and your manager and everyone else, the people who


Allison:

M.


Acute Inflections:

wanted to do the hard work that required the education, they wanted to do the dirty work for you, they did it. You know, so for us, it's been right from day one, we've got to know everything about our business, we've got to make sure we're training ourselves, we've got to learn to manage ourselves, we've got to learn to market ourselves, and that's some really strong motivation when you have it in the back of your head.


Allison:

No, that's really good, and you know it's way better to learn lessons through the hard lessons that other people have learned just by researching, then having to go through them yourself. So it sounds like you guys learned early on that you wanted to understand how things worked and be knowledgeable. and you know self managed in. In a sense, what does that look like now? Because I know that you guys work with other people and like teams. I'm not sure exactly what your team looks like Now Sounds like you might have some help with social media and I'm not sure if there's anything else. So what does that like? You know you? What does that relationship like? Is it more like you are? Because you know kind of the direction of the business? You kind of just instruct people and employ people. Or is it more like they give you direction? How does that look like? how does that look with your team?


Acute Inflections:

I mean, bottom line is we hire bad guys, that's what we call them. Like


Allison:

Yeah,


Acute Inflections:

you need to be the bad guy in our life when it comes to PR, or you need to be the bad guy


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

in our life when it comes to marketing or sort of coach us up on social media.


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

But we still reserve the right to have the final say. And


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

we're open minded. If our social media person says, you guys should be posting on TikTok five times a day, we're like. We need to post more. Yes, we're not posting five times a day. I think we're kind of a little bit of a pain, a little frustrating for them to work with sometimes because


Allison:

M,


Acute Inflections:

we don't just blindly follow instructions. But once


Allison:

M,


Acute Inflections:

they get used to it, it's a fun process of finding that middle ground, what's authentic to who we are. And we're always willing to stretch. We just don't want to go too far. I think sometimes the experts. will have you doing things that will work for what they want to achieve, but you won't be able to sleep at night


Allison:

M,


Acute Inflections:

with some of their suggestions. It's great to have those people all around you. You definitely don't want to have a circle that's just saying yes to everything you


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

want or just agreeing with everything that comes out of your mouth. It's great to have those bad guys that will


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

keep pushing you. And


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

it's also good that we've gone through doing some things ourselves because we at least know where the bar should be, you know, and can speak the language of whatever the topic is so they don't feel like they can pull on us.


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

Yeah, they definitely don't worth paying attention. So it's


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

like if they send out a press release, they know we're going to read it and comment


Allison:

M,


Acute Inflections:

on, well, that word's not a good word for our brand, you know. He should have maybe used this, which I can imagine on their end is frustrating, because they're like, hey, this is what I do all day, every day for clients for the last 20 years. And who are you to kind of? But we've also learned things ourselves, especially that public space doesn't. initially doesn't understand how much we've had to adapt in the private event world to get business. So we already have a really good understanding of what helps us get booked with companies and it's like why not use those lessons over here. Let's not start from scratch.


Allison:

M. Got. so you're taking lessons that you've learned in the private event industry, and as your growing with your influence on line, you're applying those same lessons.


Acute Inflections:

Definitely.


Allison:

Okay, what are some of those those lessons? I'm curious as to just about staying in line with your brand. Or what are you looking for when it comes to? Um, you know, moving forward with strategies,


Acute Inflections:

I think it's really recognizing. why people hire you.


Allison:

M,


Acute Inflections:

Do they want you to be fancy looking, which is a large part of our business, but then some


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

people want that fun, casual, Gatsby vibe, and then you


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

can bring that over into the public event world. And when a jazz club hires you and they're saying, well, what kind of music are you going to do? And you say, well, let's do a Gatsby night. We already know that's


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

going to work because 30, 40% of our private event gigs are Gatsby night gigs.


Allison:

M,


Acute Inflections:

You might think we should do a night of all Ella Fitzgerald tunes, but I'm telling you that's no one hires us and says let's have an Ella Fitzgerald cocktail party to celebrate my company's record


Allison:

Right,


Acute Inflections:

earnings this year. They want a Gatsby night. So


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

it's lessons like that, definitely with the repertoire, with the song selections, with the outfits, all that stuff.


Allison:

Okay, that's good, and then, when it comes to the help that you guys have right now, and you are kind of like the overseers of the artistic direction. But what have you found to be useful to get helped with or out source? Is it like the actual posting on social media, or is it Emil replies, or like, how have you built up a team that works for you?


Acute Inflections:

Definitely some outsourcing of the putting together of the social media. What's happening a lot now, I've... started capturing content if we go out to just hang,


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

and then we pass on all that footage to one of our social media people, and they put together a reel, and then we


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

take that reel and put music to it, whatever little final touches, and post,


Allison:

Right,


Acute Inflections:

voila. You know, so we've definitely passed on certain things to alleviate some of the tedious work that...


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

we are regarded to do. So that's allowed


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

things to happen more efficiently. We have this assistant that has certain templates. So the emails that go out sometimes are, they're only having to do is just plug in certain things. So


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

that just kind of helps to make their job easier as well.


Allison:

M,


Acute Inflections:

I'd say a graphic designer is huge. Oh yeah,


Allison:

M,


Acute Inflections:

I know. I love Alex. Yeah, Alex, our graphic designer is amazing. And if you don't know about Fiverr, jump on Fiverr. You'll meet some super talented people overseas, and it's affordable.


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

they really care about what you're doing. Not to say that people locally don't, but we have had really good luck with some people overseas with video editing projects, with web developing and graphic designers. You kind of need these people, and depending on what you're working on, some of these people you might need once or twice a year, and


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

other people you might need them once or twice a month. But for sure someone like she mentioned handling emails and phone calls is super useful.


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

the social media stuff. We're super picky about our voice, so


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

we haven't gotten to the place where we can just allow someone to just do everything.


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

But Olivia's really good at, give her a quick shout out if she listens to this. She's really good at saying, I think you guys should do this, and then writing a caption, and then she's super cool with the debate about the caption. We're like, well, we don't wanna say that, or we don't want that trending audio on our... like why can't we use our own audio for artists,


Allison:

Right,


Acute Inflections:

you know, so


Allison:

right,


Acute Inflections:

it's cool to have people like that that can really help make the process more efficient and then help you create things that are better received than you would have on your own.


Allison:

That's good. That's such a good way to go about it. Because yeah, there's so many. especially a lot of like you know, top forty name artists and things you hear. I don't know what horse stories you read. And obviously there's a lot of good things happening to them. But when there's just like completely, just like, focused on music and have no idea what's going on in the management or the Voice or anything like that, It's almost like you know they're not in control of their own personal brand. And so you guys have done really something really smart, And that is that you want to maintain artistic control over your voice. Um, you use other people to kind of just like bounce ideas off of, and of course, out source the things that aren't high leverage for you, so I'm curious. Like what have you whittled down To the high leverage things that you guys want to focus on? That's just specific to what you guys need to get done in a week. Like what does that look like? What are the tasks that you guys want to focus on with your time?


Acute Inflections:

More rehearsal.


Allison:

M.


Acute Inflections:

I think


Allison:

It's good,


Acute Inflections:

if there's anything that I can give the artists who don't focus on business, they are rehearsing all the time. So...


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

We've been kind of reliant on our talent.


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

We rehearsed, but definitely not as much as it looks or it seems. And so now I think it's catching up to us where,


Allison:

Right,


Acute Inflections:

so we can't control all the environments that we are in and


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

we're seeing now that rehearsal will getting it into our body so much so that no matter what's going on


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

in these strained environments that we're not moved by it.


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

an impeccable show. So I think right now focusing on actually rehearsing is key, a big thing. What's the... Yeah, I'd say rehearsing and then just continuously educating yourself so that


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

you can stay very much involved in what everyone else is doing. You never want to...


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

It's almost like babysitting kids. You can't just let your PR team just do whatever they want. You can't just


Allison:

Yeah,


Acute Inflections:

let your graphic designer do whatever he wants. Like, these people are great and they mean well, but you know, you have to stay involved and you have to be educated to stay involved and have a valuable, you know, some valuable insights on what's going on.


Allison:

That's good. so yeah, Obviously the music is like only what you guys can do, so that makes sense that like you want to keep pouring into your art, and then you find yourself in more of like, almost management of like learning and making sure that everything is going well in the way that you envisioned with you with your team. So yeah, I think that's a makes a lot of sense considering where you guys are at with where you've grown to, so I'm curious. What does like the average week look like for you guys. Now like you try to split Time between creating new music or rehearsing, Or how many events do you end up doing? What does what does the week look like for you guys? What do you try to get done?


Acute Inflections:

It's just...


Allison:

I


Acute Inflections:

It's


Allison:

know


Acute Inflections:

basically...


Allison:

the feeling is the overwhelm.


Acute Inflections:

Yeah, you're just like standing in the middle of a forest fire. And you're like, that tree's on fire, let's put it out. And then there's another one on fire.


Allison:

Oh no,


Acute Inflections:

Yeah, we're not nearly as proactive as we want to be.


Allison:

M,


Acute Inflections:

But I'd say we're spending a lot of time like trying to book new shows to advertise


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

the shows that you currently have. to make sure that the clients that you have are being serviced well, and then in between all of that, squeezing in some rehearsals, squeezing in some lessons, you know, squeezing in some other courses and educating yourself and that sort of thing. And that will shift every week. You know, it'd be one thing if our outside world is consistent.


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

But because it shifts so much, we're constantly having to move things. And that's why the forest fire analogy is perfect because,


Allison:

Yeah,


Acute Inflections:

you know, not every week is the same at all. So the plugin thinks differently every time. So I wish we could answer that better for you.


Allison:

No, it's good.


Acute Inflections:

Well, at least you know that we juice, we make sure we exercise. We clean the house at least once a week, laundry


Allison:

Yeah,


Acute Inflections:

gets done. Make sure you get your sleep. Every bill is paid, hallelujah. But


Allison:

Uh,


Acute Inflections:

it's also important, I think, to just keep a list of, like, almost a dream list. Like, I wish I could get these 20 things done this week, but then boil


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

it down to, like, the top 10%, 20%. But this is what I must get done this week, so that


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

you don't drive yourself crazy trying to do too much and missing the important things and feeling guilty because you didn't get something done. things really not that important. So, you know,


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

it is important to, I think, adjust your expectations and then just be grateful at the end of the week that, yeah, maybe I didn't get these 20 things done, but some new business came in and I was able to make sure that client had a great experience and ultimately that's


Allison:

M.


Acute Inflections:

more important.


Allison:

right, Absolutely so when it comes to you, the events that you guys are doing, Is it seasonal for you guys? I know that it's obviously you mention that things change week to week with when you're actually performing, But are things relatively consistent throughout the year or is it mostly weekdays or weekends? M. What do you cally expecting a week for your performance schedule?


Acute Inflections:

it's pretty random i'd say we perform


Allison:

Okay,


Acute Inflections:

we're fortunate to perform on weekdays more than weekends because of the corporate events, like we just got a call right before this for like some event that a credit card company is having on a Monday night, you know, so we get really quote-unquote lucky with Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday. Weekends,


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

I'd say more in the spring, summer, fall for like social, you know, weddings, birthday parties and then holiday season's just insane, but pretty much book solid from the day after Thanksgiving through New Year's. You might get a couple days off around Christmas and even that's a maybe because sometimes people are like, hey, you want to come do a Christmas brunch or whatever. But yeah, as far as like, I'd say January is definitely a little slower. Maybe end of August can be a little slower. A lot of people are on vacation then.


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

So there are these little pockets, but we're pretty steady just because we have, we've planted seeds in so many different areas. So, you know,


Allison:

M.


Acute Inflections:

you might get a random retirement home gig on a Tuesday afternoon, and then, you know, next week a corporate thing, and then next week a political fundraiser, and blah, blah, blah, blah. So you're just busy in different settings all the time.


Allison:

Oh, that's good. So the Christmas thing, By the way, That's because your album so good. like your Christmas album. That's probably I


Acute Inflections:

Thank you.


Allison:

love that one. Jasper Christmas, This is something about it.


Acute Inflections:

Thank


Allison:

but


Acute Inflections:

you.


Allison:

okay, So you guys are in a lot of different like markets Almost when it comes to. you know you have the corporate thing and that's really wise to have those seeds planted in different places like you mentioned. If you don't mind sharing, what have you learned in terms of like How to navigate these different clients and what budgets you're able to know they have for these different types of Um. ventures? Have you like? I'm sure you've kind of iron that down, like of what the different budgets are for for different types of clients Like, do you notice the difference or what does that look like?


Acute Inflections:

Yeah, there's definitely a difference. Of course, we noticed.


Allison:

Yeah,


Acute Inflections:

We like to say there's civilian pricing because clearly we can't, if you're having a house pie, we can't charge you what we would charge a corporate


Allison:

M,


Acute Inflections:

client.


Allison:

hm,


Acute Inflections:

So we are sensitive to that.


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

However, depending on what it is, if we do not believe in it, we might


Allison:

M,


Acute Inflections:

just turn it down.


Allison:

hm,


Acute Inflections:

Sometimes when we're working with a restaurant, you know, We will adjust if it's a reoccurring thing or a one-time thing. So we are sensitive to the different budgets that are out there. But one thing for sure, if we sense that someone is just nickel-ing and diming just because they can,


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

we don't honor that.


Allison:

Got it.


Acute Inflections:

We are definitely sensitive to the people who are real fans of us.


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

And if they can't afford what we would normally charge for a particular thing, depending on how much they emote


Allison:

Yeah,


Acute Inflections:

their love of us, we'll


Allison:

Right,


Acute Inflections:

bend a little bit to accommodate. So it's


Allison:

Right,


Acute Inflections:

definitely case by case. Yeah. And just being aware of what each industry expects to pay an artist, because a


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

library doing a free concert doesn't expect to pay with like a jazz festival with 30,000 people expects to be.


Allison:

Right,


Acute Inflections:

The thing that sometimes is frustrating is people don't give you all the details. So sometimes someone will call and say, I'm having a small birthday party for 20 people. What would you charge? And you're like, oh, where's it going to be? And then, oh, it's going to be on Long Island. Well, you feel like you're pulling teeth and they're


Allison:

Right,


Acute Inflections:

being really slick with how they answer. And then you show up and it's like, all right, you've got a 16-bedroom house with a tennis court. Yeah, you have


Allison:

Yeah,


Acute Inflections:

the helicopter in the backyard. Like, we shouldn't have really charged you what, you know. So it's tricky with that. And we


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

tell people when they ask, like, what do you guys charge them? We say, it depends on who's asking, you know. Because that's


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

what it's boiling down to now, and it's funny to say it that way. But


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

it's the truth, you know. It's not the same thing for everyone. And I guess it can't be the same thing for everyone because... If that be the case, then there'd be a certain sector of the population that would never experience us. And we don't feel


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

good about that.


Allison:

Hm, Oh, that's good. so it sounds like Yeah, but you experience different budgets. Sounds like corporates on one of the higher ends of them. M. What is your guy's favorite type of event to do


Acute Inflections:

It depends how much. we're trying to pay off a credit card. Like, if we have some debt that we're trying to like, hey, we got one more car payment and get this paid off, then probably one of those higher paying corporate events. Because now we've just gotten down to a science and our clients trust us. So most of the time, we've had clients who'll just text us, like, hey, can you guys be in LA on this date, this time, this location, blah, blah, blah, here's the fee. And we're like, yeah. And then you literally don't even hear from them ever again. Like, they don't. call to check your flights, it'll call to check hotels, like they just trust you and they just


Allison:

Right


Acute Inflections:

wire you the full payment like six months in advance and we're like wow that was pretty cool you know


Allison:

Right


Acute Inflections:

so those events are great just because there's so little like work on our end like a wedding client which we love our wedding couples and yes we love our wedding couples yes but yeah you know sometimes with the 76 phone calls about this song and my mom this and but I want something for my dad you know that can get a little much at times.


Allison:

Right for sure. For sure. So tell us about the Sicily tour that you guys have coming off, because that just sounds super epic. How did that come


Acute Inflections:

Thank


Allison:

about?


Acute Inflections:

you.


Allison:

And what's the plan there?


Acute Inflections:

You want to tell that to me? No, it's your friend. Yeah,


Allison:

Yeah,


Acute Inflections:

basically my friend from junior high, elementary, junior high, and high school is Italian.


Allison:

Okay,


Acute Inflections:

I can never remember if he was born here, born there, but he was always back and forth growing up to Italy. And


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

he'd spend years there. And then after graduating high school, he played professional basketball in Italy for 20 years. And so he knows everyone. He's like a star over there. Everyone knows him. So when he retired, and even when he was still playing, if he had a few months off, he'd bring some friends over from the US to Italy or to Sicily and give him a tour. So it kind of turned into this boutique. touring company and he loves our music


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

so we'd hang out when he comes back to the states and stuff and I think last year he's like, look I've just had this dream, I want to explain it to UNL and he thought it was going to be like this thing he had to sell us on. He's like, I just want you guys to come on tour and like perform at these different locations, they're so beautiful and I think your music would sound great there and you know, would you guys be willing to do that for one of my tours? I'm like... Yeah,


Allison:

Yeah,


Acute Inflections:

you're not selling me out anything bro, yeah get me out of here.


Allison:

Uh,


Acute Inflections:

And then, you know, then


Allison:

uh,


Acute Inflections:

I'll mention that, well next year we're celebrating 10 years, would it be okay to invite some fans with us? And he was like, why don't we just have it for you and your fans, you know, for the first one, just have you and your fans. So yeah, we're excited about that, we put it together, you know, use a lot of those skills that we talked about before that we learned with websites and marketing and. all that good stuff. A lot of people are excited about it.


Allison:

Amazing. So do you have fans that I've already signed up to come along with you?


Acute Inflections:

Yeah. Yeah.


Allison:

Amazing.


Acute Inflections:

Yeah.


Allison:

Now what does that look like? you still have spots? Laughter. Is that still something you guys are actively marketing or


Acute Inflections:

Yeah, we still have some spots left. Of course, we're going


Allison:

Yeah?


Acute Inflections:

to it's in September, so we definitely will keep pushing to sell it out. But it's in a good place right now. So even if we stay right here, it's what we found for me. But


Allison:

Uh, huh,


Acute Inflections:

you are all welcome to join us.


Allison:

Uh,


Acute Inflections:

Well, not all. I think we only have six spots left. We wanted to keep it intimate, so it's only going to be 12


Allison:

Right,


Acute Inflections:

people on tour. But yeah, we still have six. places like so hurry up and sign up if you want to go


Allison:

Uh,


Acute Inflections:

and we're thinking


Allison:

uh,


Acute Inflections:

Based on we're gonna of course learn whatever lessons from this one but we do plan to


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

make this a yearly thing even if it's not in cicely but just having the opportunity or offering the opportunity for fans to really spend time with us and explore you know Yeah Falling really fall in love with acute infections


Allison:

Uh,


Acute Inflections:

But this


Allison:

uh,


Acute Inflections:

gives you an opportunity to have like real conversations, you know? Because we did, you know,


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

it's, you're grateful that people love what you do, but sometimes


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

you also feel like, I wish we could, I wish we could move past the, when did you start playing bass? When did you start singing? How did you guys meet? Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, those sort of surface conversations that you have after


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

every show, after every gig. I think, you


Allison:

M,


Acute Inflections:

know, if you're spending 10 days with us, we can have a real conversation, you know? And then have


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

real memories together, because it's, it's hard sometimes, I saw you here and I saw you there and it's like, but for me it wasn't a memorable enough experience and you feel bad because you're a nice person. I wish that something happened that was memorable for the both of us. But


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

I can imagine that if we're both learning to make pasta together in Sicily, we're both going to remember that experience forever and remember each other forever. So it


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

just gives you an opportunity to really get to know your fans and your fans to get to know you at a way deeper level than you'll ever have at a show.


Allison:

Amazing, It seems like you guys really care about your fans. then


Acute Inflections:

That's how we


Allison:

Yeah,


Acute Inflections:

got them to pay us lots of money to perform for their parties and stuff. More than


Allison:

Uh,


Acute Inflections:

that. More than that. There's


Allison:

uh,


Acute Inflections:

a sense of responsibility, I think. You know, as artists, once you are on this platform in front of people, you're kind of a messenger from the universe, I guess. So to remain... open and respectful of that responsibility to use your voice or your platform to bring about healing, freedom, encourage freedom and change and unity.


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

And then on a financial level, I think artists sometimes lose sight of the fact that your fans are your employers. Like, there


Allison:

M,


Acute Inflections:

might be one millionth of your employer, but each one contributes to that whole. No fans, no income.


Allison:

Hm, amazing, Amazing. So this, this interview wouldn't be complete if I didn't ask about how you guys are such a good power couple at working together. What does that look like? Because here's a something that a lot of couples can't hack to you know, create a business together as one that's flourishing at that. So what s that look like? you guys both have your different areas of experts that you kind of stick to. Do you collaborate a lot? What are yourdifferent rules? And how does that look?


Acute Inflections:

I guess we have some things that he's stronger in or I'm stronger in, but we definitely come together to collaborate. Even that sometimes is hard because we both are very strong-minded, opinionated people.


Allison:

M,


Acute Inflections:

So the real trick is it takes work to make it work.


Allison:

M,


Acute Inflections:

It takes inner work as individuals to make it their collective work.


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

and that work doesn't stop and that's also a part of the education.


Allison:

Right,


Acute Inflections:

Having to learn new ways to self-correct so that you can continue to keep the coexistence going. And then space, lots of communication, lots of honesty, lots of uh... swallowing your pride and your ego. But


Allison:

M,


Acute Inflections:

yeah, just finding that balance and remembering that you two are friends and you two are people who love each other at first. And


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

you know, even though you're working and you're stressing this any other, don't forget. Who is it? I think it's in the book. five love languages, I think. It was, I read the book, and great, great points, but the one that really stuck out for me at the very end wasn't even necessarily one of the love languages, but it was a quote that said something like, remember that this is the person you love. You know, remember the person you love. You know, like, even though he's, you know, my work partner.


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

it's still somebody I love. So to treat


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

that person like that kind of helps to reset and diffuse if you let it.


Allison:

Right


Acute Inflections:

But yeah, it takes work to make this work.


Allison:

That. that's good and I'm curious. Other than musical talent which you guys obviously have nailed, what do you think is the most important skill that you guys have had that enabled you to create acute inflections and to flourish like it has.


Acute Inflections:

I'd say we're both pretty relentless. We


Allison:

Okay,


Acute Inflections:

don't give up easy. And we wouldn't be here if we didn't have that, because in the beginning, um. New York wasn't kind, you know, a lot of people, especially in the beginning I hadn't played the bass in ten years. It was a hobby in junior high and high school and then I stopped and then when I met her I started getting back into it so, you know, we'd both get a lot of feedback like, she's great, you need to get a new bass player kind of thing. But, you know, I needed to practice and take lessons and get better


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

and better over time. But yeah, I'd say you got to be stubborn, you got to be persistent, you got to be relentless. And if we didn't have that... And I'll add to that and say discipline. Having


Allison:

Um,


Acute Inflections:

discipline


Allison:

right,


Acute Inflections:

will help you get it done.


Allison:

Right.


Acute Inflections:

It's not going to happen any other way. It's got to be discipline.


Allison:

Oh, that's good, and I'm curious. What do you guys like? How much of your journey do you feel was hard work Versus you know, lucky things happening or making your own luck. How do you guys think about that?


Acute Inflections:

I think it's about even, right? Because the luck came because of some aspect of hard work, I'd say.


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

But what else? Yeah, I mean, it's hard to tell the difference sometimes. But


Allison:

Right,


Acute Inflections:

I think one sort of creates and fuels the other and just keeps coming back around. You know, you've got to be prepared.


Allison:

M,


Acute Inflections:

You've got to be open and willing. And I think also listening. Like, we have a lot of friends who are artists that They're very strong in their opinions and sometimes


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

it's like, you know, you got to know when to bend and when to be strong.


Allison:

Hm,


Acute Inflections:

You can't just be strong all the time and you can't bend all the time. But I think we've gotten pretty good at figuring out which situation is which. And, and if we didn't figure it out in time, looking back and saying, oh, we definitely should have been there. We definitely should have been strong there next time around making the adjustment.


Allison:

M. Guys just seems like you guys are having those conversations and like continuing to evaluate and iterate and keep moving forward Stronger. That's good.


Acute Inflections:

Yeah, lots of conversation.


Allison:

That's good. That's in forward to that. It's good to have those honest conversation because that's what you know moves things forward when you know where you are. For sure. Okay, Well, this was so much fun,


Acute Inflections:

Thank you.


Allison:

so thank you so much for for jumping on the interview. You guys are both so great and I love your music and what you guys are doing and wishing all the best. Where can people check out your music in terms of how to find you?


Acute Inflections:

Um, I'd just go to our website. If you go to acuteinflections.com,


Allison:

Keep it simple.


Acute Inflections:

you'll find links to Spotify and Apple Music and our YouTube and Amazon and all our social media platforms. But I'd say the best way to stay in touch with us is via our email list. You can sign up for our email list on our website or our text messaging list. And you literally will text with us. because we prefer to have conversations that aren't, I don't want to say censored because it's not like we're talking about anything, but you know sometimes you want to be able to ask a fan like what do you really think about this rendition or they want to ask you


Allison:

Hm.


Acute Inflections:

your thoughts on you know their daughter wanting to switch from cello to flute you know things you want and you don't want to have those conversations on Facebook where the whole world can see. So


Allison:

Hm.


Acute Inflections:

yeah we like having those personal connections.


Allison:

Amazing,


Acute Inflections:


Allison:

Well, thanks so much


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